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Ancient mysteries and alternative history by best-selling author Freddy Silva.

Just some of the dull and mundane stuff we get up to on my tours...

“Freddy painstakingly crafts his itineraries, ensuring you have a good chance of avoiding hoardes of tourists, with time to experience the subtlety and spirit of place.”
“It felt less like a tour and more like a lively and highly humourous trip with a small group of people, all of whom became friends.”
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Visiting great big portals carved out of entire hills in the middle of nowhere.

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One of our group reveals herself to be a concert pianist and gives an impromptu performance.

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“Lauren? She’s over there in that portal. What do you mean she just vanished?"

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Doing absolutely nothing on a picturesque hill., gazing at an old village, listening to sheep.

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Some come to walk among gods, and inevitably, to become gods.

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Some take a tour to walk to megaliths through the tall flowers.

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Inevitably the energy of sacred sites gets to one or two people.

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When this is the preferred mode of transportation, getting up at dawn for one day is a doddle.

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If the old churcg has no bells, we create our own music.

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Meditating and drinking the water of a holy well that’s been there for thousands of years.

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After-lunch discussion in the shade, by the Nile? Absolutely.

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Just for fun we crawl into secret chambers and meditate on, well, the important stuff.

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Because we’re a lively bunch, people often serenade us by the side of the road.

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When you go to a site that's 8000 years old you bring a picnic, even in the rain.

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The sacred site is amazing, and the road that takes you there even more so.

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Action-packed peace and quiet.

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Tourists rush. Pilgrims take their time and take in all that's around them.

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“I said ‘norse’, not ‘horse.”
Guided meditation sometimes has its drawbacks.

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What good is meditation without your very own 600-ton megalith?

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Subtle energies, walking up hills to ancient temples, stopping for tea.

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Sometimes we walk all the way up a hill just to walk back down again. Because there are dragons there.

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There are no mass-produced meals, the food is made from scratch, including the oven,

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Ten years later, these perfect strangers are still speaking to each other. And me!

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When this is the preferred mode of transport, getting up before dawn is... oh you know the drill.

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Amazing the souvenirs that some participants try to squeeze into their luggage.

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What good is a pyramid unless you have it to yourself for yoga?

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No door on your toilet? Pas de probleme, monsieur.

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Sometimes, just for fun, we have dinner inside a 4th century room and drink and talk and drink and...

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Personal time inside a sacred cave with the tide coming in? If it was good for Merlin, it’s good for me.

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Climbed mountain, entered Templar castle, saw sacred chamber, walked down, drank Templar wine.

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After three glasses of Templar wine some participants are capable of anything.

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Having coped with the sacred site, we still had to cope with the scenery.

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Sometimes, just for fun, we let people meditate in ritual chambers.

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And just for fun, we come back a year later and wake them up.

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Getting to the island and the Gothic cathedral is easy, once you negotiate the quicksand.

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Reaching the island and the Gothic cathedral is easy, once you navigate the incoming tide.

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Quicksand, tide, Why are these people still smiling? 

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Look at these poor wretches, after a full day of  sacred sites, having to sit on the street for their meal.

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Discovering humility through sacred space? Easy.
Returning unspoiled? Difficult.

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Even today there are temples you can have to yourself, if you know a guide who’s done his homework.

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Some tours take you to a loud restaurant for a finale. Here, dinner can wait. 

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The spirit of nature called.
We dialled right back.

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When the're built by an advanced civilization, staring at rocks is rational.

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Yet another outdoor dinner in a humdrum restaurant in a boring village.

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You don’t need to make sacrifices to be on these tours, but if you’re willing, we have the table.

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The quiet solitude of an ancient holy well.
Not a bad way to spend an afternoon.

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Sometimes the spirit of place requires a hardy trek into a gorge. But the fringe benefits are obvious.

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Some people take ayahuasca.
We actually see amazing stuff for real.

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To keep costs down I prefer to take the train.
Even if it requires two days in the waiting room.

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To set the tone, we began with a cozy meal at The House of Rats. The menu? Priceless.

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If the gods smile upon us we get to meditate inside Stonehenge. We smile in return. 

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Punctuality is maintained by a severe regimen of corrective behaviour.

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Half of my willing Infodels up to mischief and no-good. Spanking just out of frame.

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Deep meditation beneath megaliths.
You don’t get this in Detroit.

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“Are there snakes inside this hermit’s cell?”
Nah…crocodiles ate them."

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So, at a mountain pass at 14,000 ft there’s a Peruvian woman knitting a rug. No, really.

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Went to the high Andes to see who was crazy enough to live there. The locals came out to find out the same. 

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Sometimes, just for fun, I invite the Holy Inquisition to join the group. Demo not pictured.

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Stopping by an old cathedral on a temple of Isis, having a crepe and a cognac. One tough day.

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Another tough day. One of many, many such excruciating moments on my tours.

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We planned lunch. Tthen this outdoor market appeared. Plans changed. Damn.

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I always insist on a high standard of wardrobe, after all, if the temples look good, you should too.

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It’s not the scale or size of the temple that matters, it’s the… oh, never mind...

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It’s old, musty, the fireplace is bigger than the dining room, menu is in French. We eat here.

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“No, I’m not jet-lagged!"
“But your eating on a plate that's upside down."

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What would your story be?